MAISON CHLOÉ

“All I’ve ever wanted was for Chloé to have a happy spirit, to make people happy.”
GABY AGHION
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Chloé speaks to me on so many levels. I love the free-spirited, effortless attitude of the Chloé girl.
christian mcdonald
Clare Waight Keller  Creative Director

Clare Waight Keller has been the Creative Director of Chloé since 2011.

She oversees all aspects of the Chloé universe from ready-to-wear to accessories, fragrance, and the See By Chloé collection.

Born in Birmingham, England, Clare completed her MA in Fashion Knitwear at London’s Royal College of Art after obtaining a BA in Fashion at Ravensbourne College of Art.

Her career began in New York at the age of 21, and includes a wealth of both men’s and womenswear experience garnered in the Ateliers of Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren Purple Label. After returning to London in 2001, Clare Waight Keller became a head designer at Gucci under Tom Ford. Upon Ford’s departure, the unique opportunity came to revive the British heritage house Pringle of Scotland, where she implemented an acclaimed rebranding project from 2005 to 2011.

Today she lives between London and Paris with her husband and three children.

“Chloé speaks to me on so many levels – firstly because it’s feminine. I love the free-spirited, effortless attitude of the Chloé girl. For me, Chloé is about that fabulous piece you can wear so many different ways, and the spirit of confidence you have when you wear it. Most of all, it feels real.” – Clare Waight Keller
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800 METRES
of silk used for a runway collection
68 COLOURS
worked into a collection
3 SEAMSTRESSES
work on a single dress
30 YEARS
the tenure of our longest-standing ‘petite main’
200 HOURS
to make a bespoke, red-carpet dress
60 PEOPLE
in the Atelier pull together a runway collection
The beginning
Gabriella Anoka is born in Alexandria, Egypt, to an intellectual family. She marries her childhood friend Raymond Aghion in 1940 and, in 1945, the young couple move to Paris.
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1950s
“I designed a small collection and hired a skilled seamstress who had worked in haute couture. I went to source the buttons, the fabrics myself … I was sticking my neck out. Soon I was carried away; it was like a tornado!” — Gaby Aghion
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1952
Gaby Aghion designs her first collection and the story of Chloé, one of the first luxury ready-to-wear houses, begins. An alternative to the stiff formality of haute couture, Chloé offers an elegant and modern wardrobe with relaxed silhouettes in high-quality fabrics and refined details.
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1957
Gaby Aghion organises Chloé’s first fashion show for the Spring-Summer 1958 collection at the renowned artist’s haunt, Café de Flore. From then on and until the mid-1960s, Chloé’s youthful and spirited fashion shows are held at other Left Bank cafés, the same venues that were the backdrop to the counter-cultural revolution of the day.

“The Chloé show was held in the Closerie des Lilas, a famous literary café. The press sits around tables drinking café au lait ... while the models weave in and out of the tables.” — The New York Times
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1958
Gérard Pipart is the first young designer hired by Gaby Aghion. From 1958 onwards, the names of each of the Chloé garments follow the alphabet, a tradition that remains until 1987. It is re-introduced again with the accessories collection in 2012 by current creative director Clare Waight Keller.
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1960s
“I have a gift for recognising talent in others.” — Gaby Aghion

As defined by founder Gaby Aghion, Chloé’s romantic, cool and glamorous designs personify the aspirations of young women and are met with huge success. In the 1960s, Gaby entrusts a new generation of young talents: Gérard Pipart, Maxime de La Falaise, Michèle Rosier, Graziella Fontana and Karl Lagerfeld, to carry on her vision. These personalities work alongside each other and blossom under Gaby Aghion’s artistic direction.
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1960
Gaby Aghion and Maxime de La Falaise design an iconic shirt-dress called, Embrun.

“Designing a dress like that, like a t-shirt, was very modern. This dress had a tremendous success because it said, ‘I am carefree’.” — Gaby Aghion
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1962
In the early 1960s, the iconic silk blouse is introduced. The style becomes an essential part of the Chloé wardrobe and attitude.
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1965
In 1965, a year after his arrival at Chloé, Karl Lagerfeld designs the Tertulia dress for Spring-Summer 1966. The hand-painted art nouveau-inspired motifs set the tone for Chloé’s elegant take on bohemian chic.
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1969
In the mid-1960s, Chloé introduces loose silk trousers that glide over the skin. These pants embody a new brand of relaxed elegance, and establish the on-going tension between the feminine and the masculine in the Chloé attitude.

Photograph by Guy Bourdin
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1970s
Karl Lagerfeld proves to be a prolific talent and emerges as Chloé’s sole designer during this period (from 1974 onwards). The 1970s is marked by his soft and flou silk dresses, which celebrate a feminine and carefree romanticism with delicate lace inserts.
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1972
The first Chloé boutique opens at the corner of rue du Bac and rue de Gribeauval, in Paris’s chic 7th arrondissement.

Photograph by Alexis Stroukoff
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1973
The Rachmaninoff dress, with its graphic black and white motifs and its matching scarf tied around the head, is a perfect example of the romantic, bohemian and nomadic ethos of the 1970s.

Photograph by Jean-Luce Huré
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1974
The 1970s are an ode to the Chloé cape. Endlessly re-interpreted throughout the decade, the cape embodies a sense of fluidity and freedom of movement — a signature of the Chloé style. For summer it reveals itself in whirls of light flyaway silk; in winter, when cast in soft wool, the cape asserts a feminine interpretation of a masculine wardrobe.

Photograph by Francois Lamy
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January 1975
Karl Lagerfeld becomes the exclusive designer at Chloé. He surrounds himself and Chloé with a clique of glamorous and talented friends, including fashion illustrator Antonio Lopez and models Pat Cleveland and Donna Jordan. Together, the nightclub darlings of New York light up Paris with their joie de vivre.
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April 1975
The first Chloé fragrance is launched. The floral, feminine scent becomes one of the most popular scents of its time.
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1980s
In the early 1980s, fashion became a playground where inspiration could be found almost anywhere. Collections are designed around a major theme and brought to life in spectacular runway shows. Models dance and pirouette down the runway, making every event as much a party as a show.
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1982
For Spring-Summer 1983 Karl Lagerfeld is inspired by music. He designs the famous Angkor dress, embroidered with a trompe l’œil violin and close friend, Antonio Lopez, reinterprets this playful design with a vibrant watercolour illustration.

Illustration by Antonio Lopez
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1983
For Spring-Summer 1984, Karl Lagerfeld designs the Ciseaux dress, embroidered with a trompe l’œil scissors. This collection on the theme of sewing ends the double decade of his first long and fertile collaboration with the house.

Photograph by Guy Marineau
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1987
Following Karl Lagerfeld’s departure and a quick succession of other designers, Martine Sitbon is appointed head designer of the Maison. Her five-year tenure introduces a play on soft femininity featuring references to historical menswear and the glossy world of cabaret.

Photograph by Francois Halard
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1990s
Karl Lagerfeld returns to Chloé in 1992. Over the next few years, he mines various cultural references, from classical to pop culture, and celebrates a feminine and carefree romanticism. His spirited collections are brought to life by the famous 1990s supermodels whose larger-than-life personas defined this era.
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1993
The Spring-Summer 1994 collection is ethereal and romantic: diaphanous tulle dresses are hand-painted with motifs inspired by archaeological frescoes from the Greek island of Santorini.

Photograph by Guy Marineau
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1995
The Spring-Summer 1996 collection revives the pop and playful spirit of the Maison.

Photograph by Guy Marineau
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1997
Stella McCartney is named creative director. Fresh out of Central Saint Martins, at the tender age of 25 she becomes the Maison’s youngest ever recruit.

Photograph by Mary McCartney
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1998
Under Stella McCartney, Chloé embraces a new sexier, rock ’n’ roll attitude featuring a romantic yet streetwise mix of vintage lingerie, sharp tailoring, signature low-rise pants and printed t-shirts.

Photograph by Vanina Sorrenti
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1999
Stella McCartney brings a youthful cheekiness and glamour to the Maison; her collections reveal an eclectic mix of influences covering everything from Brit Pop, Girl Power and Saville Row. The Maison welcomes a new, insatiable generation of Chloé fans.

Photograph by Liz Collins
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2000s
Throughout this decade, three young female British designers, Stella McCartney, Phoebe Philo and Hannah MacGibbon, succeed one another in the role of Creative Director. Capitalising on this newfound energy, the Maison broadens its horizons with the launch of accessories, including bags, small leather goods and shoes, along with new sister line, See By Chloé.
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2001
Stella McCartney leaves Chloé in 2001 and her right hand and close friend Phoebe Philo succeeds her in the role of creative director.

Photograph by David Sims
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2005
With Philo’s arrival, the Maison starts to work with leather goods and in Spring 2005, Chloé releases the Paddington bag. With its oversized proportions, XXL padlock and ‘luggage’ spirit, the fashion industry’s very first ‘It bag’ is born.

Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
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March 2006
Chloé introduces wedges. The effortless attitude and refined sensibility of these shoes evoke the 1970s allure of the Maison. They go on to define Chloé’s footwear offering for seasons to come.

Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
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August 2006
Under Phoebe Philo’s artful and audacious execution, a highly covetable modern wardrobe is born. Faithful to the spirit of the brand, sexy daywear and sheer silk dresses are contrasted with masculine tailoring, for a polished yet street-smart look.

Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
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2008
In 2008, after Swedish designer Paulo Melim Andersson’s brief stint at the Maison, Hannah MacGibbon is named creative director.

Photograph by Paola Kudacki
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2009
Hannah MacGibbon’s tenure brings pure polish and sophistication to the forefront of the Chloé story. Her collections exude a confidence and a radiant softness, particular to the mood of the 1970s, which has long been a defining referential decade for Chloé’s creative directors.

Photograph by Mikael Jansson
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2010s
This decade is defined by current creative director Clare Waight Keller. Under her watch, the Maison’s allure is modernised even further as collections embrace sophisticated comfort and free-spirited ease — attitudes that never fail to seduce.
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2010
Chloé introduces the Marcie. An iconic day bag, the Marcie’s round feminine shape conveys a nomadic spirit.

Photograph by Angelo Pennetta
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August 2011
Chloé’s current creative director Clare Waight Keller joins the Maison in 2011.

Photograph by Theo Wenner
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October 2011
Clare Waight Keller’s debut collection captured the very soul of Chloé: fluid and feminine, yet ‘boyish’; it sets the tone for seasons to come.

Photograph by Glen Luchford
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2012
The Maison celebrates its 60th anniversary with the ‘Chloé Attitudes’ exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo, and an accompanying coffee table book.

Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier
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2013
Chloé reveals the Drew with the Fall 2014 collection and it emerges as a true icon, embodying the glamorous 1970s spirit that is an intrinsic part of Chloé’s heritage.

Photograph by Angelo Pennetta
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2014
The Faye, a refined and elegant day bag, with laid-back appeal arrives with the Spring-Summer 2015 collection.

Photograph by Theo Wenner
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2014
Clare Waight Keller’s Spring-Summer 2015 collection is heralded as a turning point for the designer – “When all the elements of what I’d been doing came together,” she told vogue.com. Mixing the art of the flou alongside the nonchalance of downtown denim, the collection is met with both commercial and critical acclaim.

Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
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March 2016
Fall-Winter 2016 sees Clare Waight Keller reveal a tougher side to the Chloé girl. Inspired by the adventure of life on the open road, leather motorcycle trousers and trim jackets with contoured racing stripes feature in the collection.

Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
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July 2016
The Maison launches e-commerce.
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The beginning
1950s
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1960s
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1970s
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April 1975
1980s
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  • the beginning
  • 1950s
  • 1960s
  • 1970s
  • 1980s
  • 1990s
  • 2000s
  • 2010s
  • today
Photograph by Guy Bourdin
Illustration by Antonio Lopez
Photograph by Patrick Demarchelier
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A is for Artistic
Since Gaby Aghion founded Chloé in the 1950s within the artistic circles of the Left Bank, the Maison has attracted creative spirits, artists and innovators alike. Gaby set out to establish the brand as a hothouse for young talent and fresh ideas, paving the way for the talented designers and collaborators who have shaped Chloé’s identity over the decades.
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Chloé
Photo by Etienne Tordoir
Photograph by Morgan O'Donovan
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B is for Boyish
Timeless tailoring and boyish elegance remain at the core of Chloé, often in balance with boundless femininity. The dichotomy between the two styles exists in perfect harmony in the Chloé universe, and such tomboyish tendencies add an air of nonchalance.
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Chloé
Photograph by Juan Ramos
Photograph by Liz Collins
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C is for Confident
Full of life and empowerment, Chloé has always embodied an air of confidence and independence. Founder Gaby Aghion was a visionary, a pioneer of ready-to-wear who designed clothes for women with active, modern lifestyles, much like herself.
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Photograph by David Hamilton
Photograph by Robert Fairer
Photograph by Morgan O'Donovan
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D is for Delicate
Chloé’s fluid gowns, diaphanous blouses, and ethereal lace are all synonymous with lightness and grace, the very feminine attributes at the heart of the Maison. Girlish yet sophisticated, nothing lights up a room like a woman in a Chloé flou dress.
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Photograph by David Sims
Photograph by Robert Fairer
Chloé
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E is for Effortless
Chloé illuminates women with a particular way of being in the world: one that is authentic, that doesn’t need to be artificially dressed up or a canvas for other people’s ideas. Garments are chosen and worn with a sure sense of elegance and a casual air of confidence.
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Photograph by Guy Bourdin
Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
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F is for Feminine
There is surely no other Maison more synonymous with femininity than Chloé. From the delicate lace dresses to the floor-length flou gowns, these captivating garments are designed by women, for women. But beyond the clothes we wear, Chloé embodies sisterhood and female empowerment with its all-inclusive club, #chloeGIRLS.
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Photograph by Jean -Luce Huré
Photograph by David Sims
Getty Images
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G is for Grace
Chloé girls possess natural allure and poise. Rather than commanding the spotlight, these women personify an understated elegance. An innate sense of style and ease seduces all those around her.
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Photograph by Liz Collins
Photograph by Morgan O'Donovan
Photograph by Morgan O'Donovan
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H is for Happy
"All I ever wanted," Gaby Aghion once said, "was for Chloé to have a happy spirit and to make people happy." Ever since, warmth, light and positivity have influenced everything the Maison does: from the upbeat runway shows, to the lively after parties, and the lightness and calm of our boutiques.
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Chloé
Photograph by George Harvey
Photograph by George Harvey
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I is for Independent
"I lived the life I wanted to. I always wanted to remain independent so I went for it. I had incredible faith and boldness," said Gaby Aghion on Chloé’s defining spirit of independence. It’s there in the singular design and attitude of each garment that is, in turn, embodied by Chloé girls the world over.
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Photograph by Jean-Luce Huré
Photograph by Jean-Luce Huré
Photograph by Jean-Luce Huré
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J is for Joyful
In the late 1970s and early 1980s, the models on Chloé’s runway would dance and pirouette, bringing lightness, positivity and playfulness to every show. That is the Chloé mind-set: happy, liberated, and confident. In France, moments like this evoke joyeux – or “joy”. The word simply means to be happy, to smile, laugh – all part of the Chloé spirit.
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Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
Photograph by George Harvey
Photograph by George Harvey
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K is for Kaleidoscopic
The Chloé palette eschews searing bright colours: it is subtle – brimming with warm pastel shades, and subtle variations. Spanning a spectrum that runs from Chloé’s iconic beige rosé to pure white and cream, along with coral pink, slate grey, ice blue, vanilla yellow and mint green, and gold.
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Photograph by Horst Diekgerdes
Chloé
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L is for Light
Think of a ray of sunlight coming through the blinds on a summer’s day; the Mediterranean light bouncing off the sea; the colour of the pyramids in Gaby Aghion’s Egypt; and the colour of sun-warmed skin. A symbol of femininity and beauty in its natural state, light is at the heart of Chloé. Caressed with the warmth of natural light, the Chloé woman feels free.
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Chloé
Photograph by Glen Luchford
Photograph by George Harvey
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M is for Modern
The strength of the modern woman lies in the ability to be self-defining: to decide one’s own values, tastes and desires. This mood has always been at the heart of the Maison’s DNA, ever since Gaby Aghion pioneered prêt-à-porter with her unpretentious, contemporary designs and independent spirit.
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Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
Photograph by David Sims
Photograph by Morgan O'Donovan
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N is for Natural
With her flyaway locks, healthy glow and bright-eyed allure, the Chloé woman is a natural, effortless beauty. She dresses to accentuate her allure in a chic, timeless way. It’s not about dressing up: clothes are a delight to express herself, not to please others.
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Photograph by David Sims
Photograph by Theo Wenner
Photograph by George Harvey
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O is for Optimistic
The Chloé woman is light-hearted, smiling, and youthful. This is reflected in the light, sandy shades used in Chloé collections, the light touch that Chloé takes to fashion, and the sense of spontaneity the brand embodies.
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Photograph by Clare Waight Keller
Photograph by Clare Waight Keller
Photograph by Clare Waight Keller
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P is for Parisian
Paris, and the stylish nonchalance of the Parisian woman, has always been the star in the Chloé story. During Gaby Aghion’s era, Paris was a mecca for bohemian, intellectual culture with young beatniks gathering on the Left Bank and Chloé was perfectly in sync with that Parisian mood – youthful and modern in design, rebellious in spirit. Today the city of light remains the fashion capital of the world and the Maison rests in the heart of it all, whether captured on Instagram by creative director @ClareWaightKeller or through the eyes of Chloé girls.
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Photograph by Albert Watson
Photography by Guy Marineau
Photograph by Xevi Muntane
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Q is for Quirky
Whimsical motifs and pop culture references inject a hint of irreverence and playful provocation into each Chloé collection. This art for the unexpected can be found everywhere: from the design details on the bags – a hand-tied knot in the strap and the play between different hardware accents – to the flyaway tassels adorning silk dresses and blouses.
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Getty Images
Getty Images
Getty Images
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R is for Rock
Music sets the scene in the Chloé world, from the straining riffs of a guitar at an after party, to the feel-good soundtracks on the runway. The sounds you hear affect your mood, your thoughts – and the way you move. Our love of music is also evidenced from the inspiring line-up of musicians we support: artists like Flo Morrissey, Marianne Faithful, Florence and the Machine, and Haim.
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Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
Photograph by David Sims
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S is for Spontaneous
Chloe’s air of spontaneity can be found in the easy silhouettes of the garments and the carefree attitude of the women wearing them. Designed to fit into the Chloé woman’s lifestyle – she’s always on the go – the look is never over thought, always nonchalant and relaxed.
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Photograph by François Halard
Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
Photograph by Theo Wenner
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T is for Timeless
Eschewing trends for timelessly chic essentials, the Chloé icons – the blouse, the cape, the wide-leg trouser and the wedge – are updated every season in an enduringly elegant manner. At its heart, elegance is about attitude and poise, but an exquisitely cut garment never fails to seduce.
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Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
Photograph by Etienne Tordoir
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U is for Unique
Whatever the style – be it the popular Drew bag, a silk blouse, or a piece of classic denim – a Chloé garment is distinctly unique. It’s reflected in the attitude, the colour palette, the easy silhouette, and the confident gait of the woman who is wearing it.
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Photograph by Jean-Luce Huré
Photograph by Timur Emek
Photograph by George Harvey
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V is for Vibrant
Chloé girls love life. They embody and celebrate the richness and vitality of all it has to offer. They choose a wardrobe that both flatters and empowers, clothes that come alive in vivid prints, in alluring colours and luxurious fabrics that encase the figure.
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Photograph by Christian Anwander
Photograph by Guy Bourdin
Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
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W is for Wild
The call of the wild plays a part in the Chloé design DNA. Never brash, always elegant, Chloé girls love irreverent details and wear them with a confident and often adventurous spirit.
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Photograph by Inez & Vinoodh
Chloé
Chloé
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X is for Kiss
In line with the embracing attitude of the Maison, at Chloé we always signs off our correspondence with a kiss. In turn, the ‘X’ has become creative director Clare Waight Keller’s calling card for her show notes each season, and the signature sign off from our #chloeGIRLS.
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Photograph by Jeanloup Sieff
Photograph by Melodie McDaniel
Photograph by George Harvey
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Y is for Youthful
Chloé is about keeping the carefree spirit of youth – whatever your age. Age, after all, is just a number – style lives forever. Chloé has always looked out for the young, the new, and the fresh. While the rest of fashion was catering to women of a certain age, founder Gaby Aghion wanted to appeal to all women who entertained a youthful, creative and free-spirit – women just like her.
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Photograph by Mikael Jansson
Photograph by Ola Rindal
Photograph by David Bellemere
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Z is for Zen
Calm and self-assured, the Chloé girl doesn't vie for attention. At peace with her independent spirit, she stands apart from the rest.
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